Our loved ones who have passed and crossed over are missed by us, deeply, year round. And the holiday season is a time of remembrance which causes grief to rise to the surface. We are surrounded by memories. The desire for them to be here with us, during the season, is strong.

While they can’t physically be here for holiday events, their spirit can and typically is. However, our grief can get in the way of our connection with them, like a fog surrounding us. A new tradition, one specifically designed to connect with your loved one, will help lift that fog.

Consider Two Scenarios

Scenario One - You are alone at home, setting up for the holiday dinner that evening. Resting for a moment on the living room couch, a wave of grief washes over you. You miss them, your loved one. And it’s painful. As you feel the pain, the fog of grief gets thicker around you. Right next to you on the couch is your loved one in spirit form, reaching out and loving you. But it’s difficult for you to feel them due to the heaviness of the grief.

Scenario Two - Again alone getting ready for the holiday dinner. You stop for a moment because images of your passed loved one flash through your mind and you’re feeling the pang of grief. Instead of sitting on the couch and focusing on the grief you do your new holiday tradition that is dedicated to connecting to your loved one. This motion, this movement forward in time through the act of a tradition, keeps the fog at bay. Does it eliminate the fog? Absolutely not. But it does lighten it to allow a more direct connection. A chance to feel them, hear them, or just know they are there with you in your heart.

Stagnancy or Forward Momentum

These scenarios are about being stagnant or moving forward. About not connecting and connecting. By doing a holiday tradition to honor your loved one, it lifts the stagnation and allows for a more easy connection. It welcomes them to the holiday event and reminds you that they’re always here with you.

Creating a Tradition

Your tradition can be anything. And if it’s created by you organically it will be the strongest.

Examples include, but are not limited to, lighting candles, playing a special song, bringing out an old sweater, or setting a place for them at the dinner table. There is no end to the creativity you can bring to the tradition. Just stay focused on the goal which is to create a connection to your loved one.

This process will not eliminate the pain. But it will bring in love to soothe some of your pain. Take it one step at a time and at your own pace. Listen to your intuition when it comes to creating the tradition. It doesn’t have to be grand. It just has to be infused with your love.